NEW ARTIST: A WARM WELCOME to VIOLINIST MIRIAM DAVIS!

Polyphony Arts is delighted to welcome international prize-winning violinist Miriam Davis! Miriam is a British violinist based in Norway. She performs extensively throughout the world, both as a soloist as well as in various chamber ensembles, and has won numerous international competitions – including a First Prize at the International Grand Virtuoso Competition (May 2019).  Other recent prizes include 1st prize from IMKA competition, Virtuoso Belcanto International Competition dedicated to Paganini, and the North Online International Competition. Recent solo performance venues include Concertgebouw Amsterdam, Royal Albert Hall and Stavanger Konserthus, among many others.

At the young age of 12, Miriam performed as concertmaster of the National Children’s Orchestra of Great Britain, in concert at the Queen Elizabeth Hall (London). At the age of 13 she was accepted to the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain, in which she went on to perform as Co-Leader at the BBC proms in Royal Albert Hall London. Since 2017, Miriam has studied with renowned French violinist, Philippe Graffin, including receiving her Artist Diploma at Hague Royal Conservatory in 2018.

Miriam’s greatest passion lies in the Romantic and Early 20th Century repertoire, whilst still enjoying a versatile spectrum of musical styles — ranging from the Baroque to new, personally commissioned works from contemporary composers. She is also currently embarked on a Debut CD recording, featuring several of the Ysaÿe Solo Sonatas. Miriam performs regularly with leading Dutch pianist, Jelger Blanken; 2020 saw a return to her native UK in concerto engagements, USA debut concert and further upcoming concert-tours.

Miriam is currently accepting concerto and chamber music engagements. Find out more about Miriam and sample concert programmes here: https://polyphonyarts.com/miriam-davis/

We are thrilled to have you with us, Miriam!

It’s Bad news, Good news from the chancellor for the self-employed: love and the freelance musician in a time of COVID-19

The Chancellor has announced help for the self-employed with a new grant scheme.

So, it’s good news, bad news for the self-employed, but at least there is some news at last.

We’re already well aware of the help the Chancellor has offered to businesses and people in PAYE employment, but until now, the plight of freelancers i.e. the self-employed, – and that means almost every professional musician – has gone unaddressed.

No longer. After much public debate and pressure from various political and business quarters, the Chancellor has finally announced a scheme to help sole traders and those of us who do work for ourselves.

That’s the good news.

The scheme will offer a taxable grant worth 80% of net income up to a maximum of £2,500 per month for 3 months. There is also an acknowledgement that, given the uncertainty as to how the current situation will pan out, this may be extended as and when.

So far so good, but this contains within itself much of the explanation why it has taken so long for Rishi Sunak to lay out the government’s measures for such an important sector of the country’s workforce.

The clue is in how to work out how much grant you can expect. 80% of ‘trading profits’ (that means net income to you and me), seems a clear enough sum, but the question is how will this be calculated?

But first things first. The initial question must be: who can apply? How is self-employment defined?

Does this apply to you?

The announcement specifies five criteria that you must meet to count as self-employed:

  1. you have submitted an Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018/19
  2. you have earned money as a self-employed person in the tax year 2019/20
  3. you are actively working (self-employed) at the point of making the application, (or would be but for COVID-19)
  4. you intend to continue doing so in the tax year 2020/21; and
  5. you have lost income due to COVID-19

The net income derived from your self-employment must make up more than half of your income and must total less than £50,000.

This is where the calculation becomes more complicated, but bear with me and read slowly.

The government will not limit itself to calculating the amount you may be able to claim based on your 18/19 tax return figures, but will average these over your after-tax income for the previous two tax years as well i.e. 2017/18 and 2016/2017. (Don’t forget , this must also make up more than half of your total taxable income in each of those tax years).

All of which makes reasonable sense with one proviso:, what if we have only been working in a self-employed capacity for one or two years, I hear some of us cry? Does this mean we will fall through an especial unpleasant crack? Mercifully not, if you started your self-employment between 2016-19, the Inland Revenue will only use the figures for those years for which you have filed a Self-Assessment tax return subject to the criteria set out above.

(Please note: if you have not already submitted your self-assessment tax return for 2018-19 (!!!), you must do this by 23 April 2020.

I repeat, once again, piu forte for added emphasis: IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY SUBMITTED YOUR SELF-ASSESSMENT TAX RETURN FOR 2018-19 DO IT NOW, AND AT THE VERY LEAST BY NO LATER THAN 23 APRIL 2020.

But what if you have only become self-employed in the current tax year (2019/20)and therefore filed no return? Unfortunately, in that case, you will not qualify for this scheme and you will have to rely on Universal Credit (see further information at the end of this article).

How much can you expect to claim?

This is the nub of it. We have seen that the Treasury/Revenue will look at your net income averaged over the last three tax year and allow 80% of that figure  (i.e. 3 years’ net income divided by 3 x 80%).

But (and there almost most always is a but), this will be capped at a maximum of £2,500 per month payable for 3 months as things currently stand.

But that’s still good news and there’s more: the grant will be paid directly into your bank account in one lump sum.

Please note, the grant does not have to be repaid – it’s a grant, not a loan (more good news!) –  but it will count as income for tax purposes when you are filling out your 20/21 return. (May we all live so long.) If you claim tax credits, you must include any grant you receive in your claim as income.

So, what’s the bad news. (Apart from the whole lousy situation?)

The bad news

You can’t apply yet. In fact, you can’t actually apply at all, and you can’t expect any money before June.

So how will you know if you are eligible? Don’t worry, HMRC will contact you if you are, and invite you to apply online.

Do not call them, do not hassle them now; our trusty tax folk are working their socks off to get all those self-assessment tax returns that were submitted for Jan 30 this year processed so they can make the necessary calculations and identify who will qualify. Let them get on with it.

I’m sure you will all have heard it before: “don’t call us, we’ll call you.”

On a brighter note, although the grant may not be paid until June, it will be backdated to March.

A word of warning

With this in mind, be on your guard for scammers who are always looking to make a fast buck out of someone else’s crisis. If someone texts, calls or emails claiming to be from HMRC, saying that you can claim financial help or are owed a tax refund, and asks you to click on a link or to give information such as your name, credit card or bank details, it is a scam. Hang up the call, delete the text or the email and carry on with your day.

But what about now?

Having read all this you may be feeling what might at best be described as modified rapture. There is help at hand, but that hand is not going to show itself for a good two months. Many of us are hurting now.

So what other more immediate help is available?

Other help you can get

Until this grant scheme kicks in, here is a list of additional help for the self-employed the government is also providing:

You can find details of this and the information set out in this article on the government website here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-coronavirus-covid-19-self-employment-income-support-scheme

Help Musicians has also launched a £5million financial hardship fund. You can find more details here: https://www.helpmusicians.org.uk/news/latest-news/advice-relating-to-coronavirus-covid-19

Final advice

We’ll keep you posted if and when we get more information to help all you music freelancers out there, but, in the meantime:

STAY SAFE; STAY POSITIVE; STAY HOME and WASH YOUR HANDS!

Margaret Pinder

Polyphony Arts

27 March 2020

Join our mailing list for career tips and more advice for musicians and get our FREE guide “Four Essential Tips For Building Your Network: A Resource For Musicians“ : https://polyphonyarts.com/mailing-list/

NEW ARTIST! A warm welcome to award-winning composer Edwin Roxburgh!

Polyphony Arts is delighted to welcome Edwin Roxburgh to the Polyphony Arts team!

Distinguished composer and virtuoso oboist, Edwin has won numerous prizes and Fellowships. As a student, he was recipient of the Elgar Trust Award through a BBC Symphony Orchestra commission, as well as a British Academy Award for his Oboe Concerto, An Elegy for Ur, and a Cobbett Medal for Services to Chamber Music.

Edwin’s musical works encompass a broad range of instrumental setting, adventuring through a variety of sophisticated, fascinating sound worlds. His work Saturn, with a tribute to Holst, explores the mythical characters of its moons and satellites, in “an epic orchestral and electronic space-scape effortlessly blending Roxburgh’s understanding of Boulez and Stockhausen with a Birtwistle-like sense of ritual” (The Wire). He awaits a performance of his opera Abelard (libretto by Edwin and Julie Roxburgh), published by United Music Publishing under the auspices of a Leverhulme Research Fellowship. Other commissions include How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear, for narrator and orchestra, produced on ITV’s Aquarius with Vincent Price and Diana Menuhin as narrators. Recordings of Edwin’s works are available on various prestigious labels, including NMC, Naxos, Warehouse and Metier.  

Beside his busy career as a composer, Edwin’s artistic activities include performing, conducting and teaching. He is currently a visiting tutor and researcher at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, where he was awarded an Honorary Fellowship, and has conducted numerous premieres – originally with the Twentieth Century Ensemble of London, which he founded, and later with several other principal orchestras of the UK.

You can read more about Edwin here: https://polyphonyarts.com/edwin-roxburgh/

What a pleasure to have you with us, Edwin!

The implications of the impact of COVID-19 for musicians and live performance venues: an agent’s perspective

As international concern about coronavirus spreads and different governments give different advice and introduce different measures to deal with what has now been designated a pandemic, those of us who work in live performance are facing an uncertain professional and financial situation as venues close, engagements are cancelled, and predictions over the severity and duration of the outbreak seem confusing, not to say downright contradictory.

As a boutique music and events management agency, we at Polyphony Arts are extremely sensitive to the impact this will have on our clients. We are a team of three women with differing demands on our time, which means we are used to flexible and remote working, enjoying the ability to use email and videoconferencing calls to manage our clients’ business around the world as well as enjoying each other’s company in our regular co-working sessions. If we have to self-isolate, we can, technically, continue with business as usual.

But our business is dependent upon the artists and arts organisations we represent, and our concern has to be protecting their careers in the medium to longer term, and their income as an immediate priority. These are the questions we have been increasingly facing as the virus and the accompanying measures dominate our headlines.

There are, of course, several aspects to this crisis which have implications for musicians who rely on their physical presence and skill to earn their living, and venues and organisations who rely on the physical presence of those performers and the wider public to generate their revenue.

So the first question, of course, is how is the virus likely to impact the performing arts in light of this?

The evolving medical situation

We know the virus is highly contagious. The statistics show a high rate of infection and spread within the population. People with compromised immune systems and other underlying health issues, especially the elderly, are particularly vulnerable. All of us are asking, how can I protect myself and how can I protect those who are close to me and those who are especially vulnerable? This is, understandably, almost immediately followed by question: what are the implications for my work is a live performer or for my business is a live performance venue or event?

Our first port of call for help and advice on how to manage ourselves is, not unreasonably,  our government(s). In the UK this can be found on the UK government website under various headings. The current advisory for those who believe they have contracted the virus can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance

The main messages are:

  • if you have symptoms of coronavirus infection (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home and do not leave your house for seven days from when your symptoms started.
  • plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home
  • ask your employer, friends and family to help get the things you need to stay at home
  • stay at least two metres (about three steps) away from other people in your home whenever possible
  • sleep alone, if that is possible
  • wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water
  • stay away from vulnerable individuals such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions as much as possible
  • you do not need to call NHS111 to go into self-isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better after seven days call or contact NHS 111 online.

Arguably these measure should also apply if you believe you have been in contact with someone who has contracted the virus.

Travel restrictions

Staying home is fine, if you have no engagements and need to put in some serious time practising your scales (assuming the dry cough that is one of the symptoms will let you), but not if you have engagements in your calendar.

And what if you feel perfectly well, but those engagements are overseas? We now know Italy is in lockdown so all concerts and public events are cancelled even if you could get a flight into the country. The US has (reluctantly) introduced a ban on travel to and from various countries (but not the UK and Ireland?!) The landscape is changing every day. When I began researching this article two days ago, there was a page on the government website with advice for travellers returning to the UK from overseas. Visiting it again today, I find it has been withdrawn and I am redirected to the page quoted above giving stay at home guidance.

International travel seems to be pretty much off the table. Flights are being cancelled (we might spare a thought here for the airline industry which operates on extremely tight margins and which is also deeply worried about the survival of some carriers).

But, even if you managed to get yourself to your venue in Belgium, say, or Japan? The likelihood is that you will find it closed and events cancelled. Yesterday, classical-music.com, the official website of BBC music magazine, published a list of tours and festivals that have been cancelled or postponed due to coronavirus (which we should now refer to by its proper title: COVID-19)

http://www.classical-music.com/article/coronavirus-updated-list-tours-and-festivals-cancelled-or-postponed-due-covid-19

That list is only set to grow.

Contractual matters

So the next question for both performers and venues is, inevitably, what about our contracts? What are the terms for cancellation and how will this affect my income?

Solicitors, Harbottle & Lewis, who represent a number of significant music clients have a issued an overview of the likely legal position regarding those contracts in English law – many of the principles are likely to be similar in other jurisdictions. You can read their insight here:  https://www.harbottle.com/coronavirus-contracts/

To summarise, it is likely your contract contain a force majeure clause. This is a clause which spells out what happens if any one of the parties to that contract cannot perform their contractual obligations because of events outside their control. This is likely to cover the coronavirus pandemic as a “triggering event”. The clause will also set out if the parties are allowed more time to perform their obligations, who pays any increased costs, and whether there is a right to terminate the contract. But this is a matter of interpreting the contract’s exact wording. Many force majeure clauses require contract performance not to be possible at all. If a venue has been closed because of government requirements that may be seen differently from a musician deciding to self-isolate because they feel unwell or have had contact with a sufferer. This is important! Harbottle & Lewis are very clear: “careful analysis of the wording of your contract is important to make sure that you are not jeopardising your position. Getting it wrong can have serious consequences, and may put you in breach of your contract.”

But what if you have read your contract and it does not appear to contain a force majeure clause? In that situation you may find you are subject to what lawyers call “the doctrine of frustration”. Now, we are all feeling pretty frustrated with the whole COVID-19 situation, but this is a specific legal concept which arises where a party to a contract simply cannot fulfil a fundamental obligation under that contract, due, for example, to an unforeseen event such as the government locking down all travel or a venue closing due to a contamination. In this case the parties are released from their contractual obligations. (Again, it all depends on the exact wording of the contract in question).

Financial consequences

But, of course, that includes the obligation to pay fees. It may be frustrating and disappointing to find you won’t be playing the Walton viola concerto to a packed audience in King’s Lynn, but it is downright worrying to know that you won’t be getting paid either and there’s plenty more of that coming down the line. Similarly, it may be heart breaking to see all the careful preparation and plans you have made for your beautiful festival coming to nothing, but it may also, and more importantly, be actually bank-breaking to have paid out in anticipation of the event and not being able to realise the income. And what about all that grant funding you have been awarded and, in part, already spent? We are still waiting upon the Arts Council to decide on its policy in this regard and many other grant funding bodies large and small will have to be taking similar positions regarding the repayment or otherwise of moneys awarded to projects that have to be cancelled.

What can you do? The answer at the moment is not a comforting one. If you have cancellation insurance, that’s great, but it is very expensive and only large venues and events can really afford to carry it. The latest budget announced by the Chancellor this week offered a lot of help to small businesses who are affected by COVID-19, but most of this is unlikely to reach arts organisations and individual, self-employed musicians.

People who are not eligible for sick pay such as the self-employed will now be able to claim Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) from day one of illness rather than day eight. ESA is form of aid to those who are too sick to work (provided they meet certain conditions) and is worth £73.10 a week (£57.90 if you a child genius i.e. under-25). Not exactly riches. There are now calls for statutory sick pay to be extended to the self-employed.

But there are also knock-on effects that are not caught directly by advice or legislation. How do people with young children manage to continue working if child care centres and schools close? Our founder and director, Katie, has a three year-old son. She is very dependent on regular childcare to run the agency. We have had a lot of conversations among ourselves about the implications for her and all three of us if Sam can’t go to his pre-school. We all know musicians who are in a similar situation.

Some options you may have

As agents we can’t force venues to open or contracts to be honoured nor should we if we want to be responsible in doing our bit to help mitigate the spread of the virus, but what we can do for our clients is be proactive in managing cancellations and asking for rebookings even if these are as far ahead as 2021. If a venue liked our artists well enough to book them now, why wouldn’t they be sympathetic to moving that booking to a time when we all hope this situation will have finally passed? There is a lot of good will out there amidst all the stress; tap into it!

If you do not have representation, this advice still works for you. Speak to your promoters and venues. Some circumstances are out of your control; being pro-active about managing cancelled engagements going forwards is something you can and should be exploring.. 

A final word

Finally, and this is a personal message from us all at Polyphony Arts, one of the best things you can do, and one that can get lost in the blizzard of conflicting information and anxiety, is to take care of yourselves. This is a stressful time for all of us and one of the hidden casualties of the virus is not our physical, but our mental health. Take care, and be aware of your stress and do your best to manage your well-being. The music community is a close knit and supportive one. We need to stand together, to be responsible, and to take care of ourselves and each other. Our livelihoods and our industry depend upon it.

Margaret Pinder

Music Manager, Polyphony Arts

www.polyphonyarts.com

At Polyphony Arts we strive to support musicians through the opportunities and challenges of being part of the modern music scene. If you’d like to join our mailing list for free tips and advice, you can sign up here https://polyphonyarts.com/mailing-list/

If you are interested in our range of services and online courses for musicians, you can read more about them here https://polyphonyarts.com/services-and-courses/

Disclaimer: this article is drawn from a number of identified sources. Polyphony Arts does not hold itself out to have any expert knowledge of the medical or legal content of this article. If readers have any questions or concerns about the issues touched on here, we recommend they seek appropriate specialist medical or legal advice.

LINKS:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-specified-countries-and-areas/covid-19-specified-countries-and-areas-with-implications-for-returning-travellers-or-visitors-arriving-in-the-uk

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-list-of-guidance

The World Health Organisation also provides some advice on how to cope with stress during the outbreak: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

https://www.afm47.org/press/advice-for-musicians-in-relation-to-coronavirus-covid-19/ (USA)

https://www.musiciansunion.org.uk/Home/News/2020/Mar/advice-for-musicians-Coronavirus-covid-19?utm_source=Musicians+Union&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=11373985_March+Newsletter+2020&dm_i=2QJ%2C6RS81%2C4VVQ7Z%2CR2YVJ%2C1

https://www.harbottle.com/coronavirus-contracts/

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/12/uk-governments-coronavirus-advice-and-why-it-gave-it

Deadlines – love them or loathe them?

Katie Beardsworth, Director and Founder of Polyphony Arts

Do you work well with deadlines? Do they motivate you, or fill you with dread?

Personally, I need deadlines – I need the pressure and motivation to get things done, especially when they aren’t my favourite tasks. I often set timers on my phone while I’m working, giving myself 20 minutes to complete tasks and move on to the next. I set imaginary deadlines for work that doesn’t have an in-built deadline to make sure it doesn’t languish on my to-do list. I love deadlines!

I started doing online courses last year. When I first signed up I was unsure; would I learn anything? Would it be worth the cost?

However, when I started doing them, I discovered that they are a fantastic way to learn new skills, for a fraction of the cost of more formal learning options. As a freelancer, I am responsible for developing my own career, and with the online course market booming, I soon found I could offer myself career development in a really rewarding way that is really effective in both cost and time.

I have experienced courses that are ‘self-paced’ – i.e. you buy the course and do it in your own time, with little or no further contact from the course creator – and that have deadlines and feedback. There are pros and cons to both, but for me personally, I got more out of the courses with deadlines and feedback. Being accountable for doing the course in a timely manner really helped me to learn a lot in a short space of time, and I came out of it fully prepared to use my new skill.

When I was planning my online course, Become Your Own Agent, I gave a lot of thought to whether to set deadlines on the tasks, or keep it self-paced – open and flexible. The course is aimed at professional musicians, and that means that my own experiences weren’t necessarily the best gauge – the working week of a professional musician is very different from mine, often with minimal computer-based time available. However, I wanted people to get the best of the content I had to offer, so I launched the course with deadlines and weekly feedback available from me.

It went really well – those that signed up were totally engaged and I read some great work! It was fantastic to get to know those people and their work. They said some lovely things about the course, too – I was so thrilled to hear this!

“Incredibly insightful to see things from the point of view of the promoter”

You inspire confidence and your approach is encouraging”

However, I also had a great deal of feedback from people who didn’t sign up, saying that the challenges of doing tasks to a deadline in the midst of freelance life was too difficult, and asking for a version that they could access and complete in their own time. I also heard that the cost of the course was difficult for freelancers to manage as an up-front cost, and was asked if I could offer payment plans.

So, I am delighted to say that all of this is possible! I now have two versions of the course available from 3 March 2020. Both have the same content, but one has deadlines and the option of feedback from me if you meet those deadlines; and the other is self-paced, with a price that reflects that, and a monthly payment plan available.

Check out the full details here, and sign up to take your career to the next level! https://polyphonyarts.com/services-and-courses/

Do you work well with deadlines?

I need deadlines – I need the pressure and motivation to get things done, especially when they aren’t my favourite tasks. I often set timers on my phone while I’m working, giving myself 20 minutes to complete tasks and move on to the next. I set imaginary deadlines for work that doesn’t have an in-built deadline to make sure it doesn’t languish on my to-do list. I love deadlines!

I started doing online courses last year. When I first signed up I was unsure; would I learn anything? Would it be worth the cost?

However, when I started doing them, I discovered that they are a fantastic way to learn new skills, for a fraction of the cost of more formal learning options. As a freelancer, I am responsible for developing my own career, and with the online course market booming, I soon found I could offer myself career development in a really rewarding way that is really effective in both cost and time.

I have experienced courses that are ‘self-paced’ – i.e. you buy the course and do it in your own time, with little or no further contact from the course creator – and that have deadlines and feedback. There are pros and cons to both, but for me personally, I got more out of the courses with deadlines and feedback. Being accountable for doing the course in a timely manner really helped me to learn a lot in a short space of time, and I came out of it fully prepared to use my new skill.

When I was planning my online course, Become Your Own Agent, I gave a lot of thought to whether to set deadlines on the tasks, or keep it self-paced – open and flexible. The course is aimed at professional musicians, and that means that my own experiences weren’t necessarily the best gauge – the working week of a professional musician is very different from mine, often with minimal computer-based time available. However, I wanted people to get the best of the content I had to offer, so I launched the course with deadlines and weekly feedback available from me.

It went really well – those that signed up were totally engaged and I read some great work! It was fantastic to get to know those people and their work. They said some lovely things about the course, too – I was so thrilled to hear this!

“Incredibly insightful to see things from the point of view of the promoter”

You inspire confidence and your approach is encouraging”

However, I also had a great deal of feedback from people who didn’t sign up, saying that the challenges of doing tasks to a deadline in the midst of freelance life was too difficult, and asking for a version that they could access and complete in their own time. I also heard that the cost of the course was difficult for freelancers to manage as an up-front cost, and was asked if I could offer payment plans.

So, I am delighted to say that all of this is possible! I now have two versions of the course available from 3 March 2020. Both have the same content, but one has deadlines and the option of feedback from me if you meet those deadlines; and the other is self-paced, with a price that reflects that, and a monthly payment plan available.

Check out the full details here, and sign up to take your career to the next level! https://polyphonyarts.com/services-and-courses/

Do you work well with deadlines?

I need deadlines – I need the pressure and motivation to get things done, especially when they aren’t my favourite tasks. I often set timers on my phone while I’m working, giving myself 20 minutes to complete tasks and move on to the next. I set imaginary deadlines for work that doesn’t have an in-built deadline to make sure it doesn’t languish on my to-do list. I love deadlines!

I started doing online courses last year. When I first signed up I was unsure; would I learn anything? Would it be worth the cost?

However, when I started doing them, I discovered that they are a fantastic way to learn new skills, for a fraction of the cost of more formal learning options. As a freelancer, I am responsible for developing my own career, and with the online course market booming, I soon found I could offer myself career development in a really rewarding way that is really effective in both cost and time.

I have experienced courses that are ‘self-paced’ – i.e. you buy the course and do it in your own time, with little or no further contact from the course creator – and that have deadlines and feedback. There are pros and cons to both, but for me personally, I got more out of the courses with deadlines and feedback. Being accountable for doing the course in a timely manner really helped me to learn a lot in a short space of time, and I came out of it fully prepared to use my new skill.

When I was planning my online course, Become Your Own Agent, I gave a lot of thought to whether to set deadlines on the tasks, or keep it self-paced – open and flexible. The course is aimed at professional musicians, and that means that my own experiences weren’t necessarily the best gauge – the working week of a professional musician is very different from mine, often with minimal computer-based time available. However, I wanted people to get the best of the content I had to offer, so I launched the course with deadlines and weekly feedback available from me.

It went really well – those that signed up were totally engaged and I read some great work! It was fantastic to get to know those people and their work. They said some lovely things about the course, too – I was so thrilled to hear this!

“Incredibly insightful to see things from the point of view of the promoter”

You inspire confidence and your approach is encouraging”

However, I also had a great deal of feedback from people who didn’t sign up, saying that the challenges of doing tasks to a deadline in the midst of freelance life was too difficult, and asking for a version that they could access and complete in their own time. I also heard that the cost of the course was difficult for freelancers to manage as an up-front cost, and was asked if I could offer payment plans.

So, I am delighted to say that all of this is possible! I now have two versions of the course available from 3 March 2020. Both have the same content, but one has deadlines and the option of feedback from me if you meet those deadlines; and the other is self-paced, with a price that reflects that, and a monthly payment plan available.

Check out the full details here, and sign up to take your career to the next level! https://polyphonyarts.com/services-and-courses/

‘Become your own agent’ is back!

Booking is now open for ‘Become Your Own Agent’, our online course which helps musicians take their careers to the next level. The courses are available from 3 March 2020.

Are you a professional musician without an agent? You’ll know promoting yourself and getting noticed by the right people is often a huge challenge, no matter what stage your career is at.

The industry is also changing rapidly, so many of the old rules and conventions no longer apply. With digital, social media, limits on time, and many other people competing in the same space, there’s more to do than ever.

Here’s where I can help, creating an agent who knows you best: You!

I’ll help you learn all the tools and tricks of the trade so you can promote yourself and your work to the venues, promoters, broadcasters and festivals that you want to reach.

You’ll also have the option to join our Facebook community, exclusively for Polyphony Arts online course participants, to connect with other music professionals and share advice, challenges and successes with them.

The course will teach you to:

  • Get more performances/commissions
  • Achieve your ideal fees
  • Attract work offers from higher profile venues and artists
  • Boost your profile in the industry
  • Build a list of useful contacts
  • Get the best out of your network
  • Tackle imposter syndrome and other barriers to promoting yourself

Participants on the last course said:

“Incredibly insightful to see things from the point of view of the promoter”

“You inspire confidence and your approach is encouraging”

The course is available in two forms – with weekly tasks and feedback, if you like deadlines and want to see results in four weeks (course starts Tuesday 3 March 2020), or self-paced, if you need to spread the work and the cost over time.

Details of the course with feedback and deadlines

Details of the self-paced course with payment plan option

Undecided? Visit our Services and Courses page to compare the two options and decide what is right for you. Or, email us with any questions.

We’d love you to join us on one of our courses!

“Never mind, maybe next time” — The Need of Closing the Gap between the Arts and Disabilities

By Graziana Presicce

My dad has Parkinson’s disease. It’s one of those things which, unfortunately, just happens. As with any disability, new circumstances inevitably bring some adaptations and new routines in one’s everyday life: whether involving medicines, more frequent visits to the toilet, or the need of taking into account how tired the body may feel on particular days, making walking more challenging than usual.

Through my work, being fully immersed in the arts, there are numerous events to which I wish to bring my parents along. Yet, there are often times where the answer eventually turns into a “never mind, maybe next time”. Being a classical pianist myself, my love for classical music, attentive audiences and concert halls is granted. Yet, the expectation of a still, quiet audience often does not make these concerts an ideal environment for people affected by Parkinson’s. It is unpredictable how strong the uncontrolled movements or shaking may be on certain days or times of the day. It is also unpredictable who is going to sit next to you: there might be the occasional glance on you; and it’s an uncomfortable feeling. Stress certainly does not help towards the effects of Parkinson’s, and such events should certainly not be a reason for stress—quite the opposite! Anyone, regardless of one’s condition, should have the chance to fully enjoy music, without having to think twice whether “it’s OK or not” to attend. 

It’s thrilling to see initiatives from the arts in taking a step closer towards disabilities; for instance, through relaxed performances. If you are in Hull and surroundings, we are excited to be hosting Hull Chamber Music’s very first relaxed concert ‘A Musical Journey’ at the Ferens Art Gallery, Friday 21st February 2020 at 11am! Carers and under 18s are welcome to attend for free (Standard Ticket: £10). Anyone attending will be free to move around, without any need of sitting still and quiet. The performance will also be BSL interpreted, as BBC Music Magazine’s Instrumental Award winner violinist Fenella Humphreys, alongside international pianist Nicola Eimer, will guide the audience through a musical journey around the world. Babies and toddlers are also most welcome to the event.

To book, visit: https://www.hullboxoffice.com/event/hull-chamber-music-and-culture-tots-present-a-musical-journey-around-the-world/

It would be lovely to see you there — do spread the word!

One final note: we recently launched a Crowdfunding campaign to give away tickets to those who cannot otherwise afford them. Tickets are distributed through local charities, including Parkinson’s and Mind, among others. We would be incredibly grateful if you could chip in to let us reach our new target; if this is not possible for you, simply sharing the link below and encourage your friends to do so would be immensely helpful (we have only 8 days left to achieve this!):

https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/hullchambermusic

We have been overwhelmed by people’s generosity so far. We hope to reach our new target and making chamber music more accessible to all.

Thank you for reading. Now let’s make the difference together! 


Graziana

WE ARE THRILLED TO WELCOME “THE COME AND SING COMPANY” TO POLYPHONY ARTS!

Polyphony Arts is delighted to be working with a new, exciting company: The Come and Sing Company (CASC)! CASC brings people together in song, with the aim of creating tailor-made musical workshops and events to help people connect through music. To deliver this, CASC’s exceptional team of performers, conductors, workshop leaders (and more!) share decades of musical experience.

Co-founded by Tom Appleton and Elenor Bowers-Jolley, CASC’s clients include the National Trust, Silver Spoon, Wexford Mental Health Association, Snape Maltings, the Norfolk and Norwich Festival, Wellington College, among many others. With Norfolk Music Hub (NMHub), CASC brought 27 primary schools together in a fusion of Norfolk folksongs and the music of South Asia. Among the numerous projects, a partnership with Arts and Gardens (supported by the National Trust) gave rise to ‘Lyveden New Bield–A Secret Concert’ and ‘Come and Sing in Secret’, with the aim of making a visitor’s experience closer to founder Thomas Tresham’s original vision for the site, whilst better connecting with the local, regional and national audience.

CASC led a number of other events, such as choral workshops for adult choirs, vocal and conducting technique CPD sessions for teachers, prep school choral days, come and sing Disney/musicals, health and wellbeing sessions, and many teambuilding days for businesses.

You can read more about CASC here: https://polyphonyarts.com/come-and-sing/

A pleasure to have you with us, The Come and Sing Company!