Martyn Roper: Blues Guitar

“The beauty of having Albert is that we see more of family and friends than before and I’d like a chance to start allowing those family and friends to support us as freelancers in real life.”

Welcome back to our blog series, talking to leading musicians who are also parents about their experiences of balancing their careers with family life. This week, we meet Martyn Roper, blues guitarist, who talks about how his busy gig schedule works alongside his wife’s freelance career, the challenge of working when breastfeeding, and the importance of friends and family.

How many children do you have and how old are they?

I have one child, a sweet and lovely boy named Albert. He was born in August 2018.

Tell us a bit about your work and how it is structured.

I generally work ‘one nighters’ which can be 3 to 14 (a record in one week!) gigs a week. 3-6 gigs is normal for me in a week. They range from weddings, parties, festivals, pubs, bars, restaurants, care homes, etc. At various times over the year my duo do longer tours for weeks at a time in arts centres and venues all over the UK. All weeks are different but 80% of the time I’m booked up Thursday to Sunday every week.

Tell us about your work/parenthood balance. 

I make at least one full day a week where computers / phones aren’t really used unless in desperate circumstances and the aim is to get away from the house and out. During time at home I make sure we get out to do stuff even if just a walk and try and give my son complete attention for periods of time between work / rehearsal time. I usually structure this around meals and cooking.

Have you had to turn down opportunities because of being a parent? How did this make you feel?

Not sure I’ve turned things down but it does take good organisation to fit things in. I’ve been happy to let some gigs slide if a week was already well booked so we can have family time.

Do you have a partner, and if so are they also freelance? What effect does this have?

Chloé is a freelance graphic designer / web builder / photographer and I think home time with a baby can get messy at times. We’re 100% breast feeding so although I can do lots of shopping / cooking / washing etc baby needs to be with mum or near all the time which makes it hard for her to get a good run at work. On the other side the fact that we’re both in the house nearly all daytimes and free especially on Mondays to Wednesdays means that Albert probably gets more face to face time than working a 9-5 as his bedtime would mean only a few hours a day instead of the 10 – 16 hours he probably gets now.

Do you have regular childcare, and if so, in what form? 

None, due to the reasons above. I have family nearby but visits tend to be social due to his feeding needs. I would like to be able to start passing Albert on a little bit more soon as the support of family could make it possible for us both to get more done and hopefully have more family time afterwards. Even if we’re in the house but they just baby sit him while we get a couple of hours to sort some admin.

Have you performed anywhere that made the work/parenthood balance easier?

Some venues and festivals especially in the daytime have been great to us and welcomed our boy and gone out of their way to make it as pleasant as possible for us.

What can promoters/venues/festival organisers do to help freelance artists who are parents?

The same thing they do to anyone to make their life easier. I think we’re all equal with or without children and its down to us to manage our lives and children as well as work.

Are there any organisations/venues/festivals etc that you have worked with that are particularly supportive of performers who are parents?

My work is varied so I wouldn’t take the baby to say a private wedding. The nice blues / jazz festivals are so lovely. Some of the dementia wards are very inquisitive once I mention I have a child, and we’ve all been invited in when I perform. We did this once and had a lovely afternoon at a home in Harrogate.

How did being a freelance musician affect your parental leave?

No such thing. I cleared a two week period (apart from one gig) around the birth but he was born over a week late so I had to find cover for a gig the day he was born. I had an afternoon wedding gig near Leeds the day after the birth so left the hospital for about five hours and came straight back ASAP.

Were you freelance before you had children? If not, what prompted the change?

For about seven years before.

Are you part of any online social groups for freelancers/freelance parents? 

I’m not. To be honest, I don’t have time to do all the work I need to and am trying to find ways to minimise wasted time so more social media interaction that kind of ‘sucks you in’ isn’t good. The beauty of having Albert is that we see more of family and friends than before and I’d like even more of that and a chance to start allowing those family and friends to support us as freelancers in real life.

A professional musician since 2011, Martyn Roper specialises in 1920s, 30s & 40s blues, jazz and swing music on guitar, banjo, ukulele and double bass. He plays over 200 gigs a year largely between three acts; Leeds City Stompers (trio); The Washboard Resonators (duo) and solo sets, and lives near central Leeds. He likes collecting vintage guitars, cooking, reading and his two beautiful cats.

Anna Leese: Soprano

This blog post contains Anna Leese’s honest perspective on life as a freelance musician, parent,and full time carer for her partner, who is terminally ill with Motor Neuron disease.

Writing this blog has allowed me to share the stories of many inspirational people, and I am honoured to have been trusted with the stories and experiences, many of which are highly personal. This one has been the hardest to read and prepare, and I share it with Anna’s permission and in the hope that it will help others whose lives are unusually complex and difficult. Thank you so much for sharing this, Anna.

How many children do you have and how old are they?

I have one son, Matteo, who is 3 and 4 months.

Tell us a bit about your work and how it is structured.

I teach 4-5 days of the week when I am home (not performing out of town). I am a voice tutor at the University of Otago, I teach private voice, and music classes to littlies (all of which I love). Probably 10/15 weekends a year I travel away for orchestral concerts throughout New Zealand and Australia, and sometimes the UK. A trip away for an orchestral concert is usually 2-5 days away. And I perform an average of one opera a year, which means 2 months away from home. I have control over my schedule to a degree. On average I think I probably work 40 hours a week, not including my home duties, raising my son and caring for my sick husband. I do some sort of work every day, and I often work in the evenings after I’ve put my son to bed. I’ve also just enrolled in a DMA, which means my workload is going to change!

Tell us about your work/parenthood balance. 

I have my son in care 5 mornings a week while I teach. I get some weekends with him, and two afternoons a week. I am either working or caring for my son, 100% of the time, there is pretty much no downtime. But I have learned a lot about myself doing this, and I’ve become really resilient and also really efficient! I think I’m a better person for having been given these challenges, which means my son will have a kick-arse, hard working mum 🙂

Have you had to turn down opportunities because of being a parent? How did this make you feel?

Absolutely. But it’s becoming less so. My husband is terminally ill, so I need to think of his care as well as my sons’ care when I travel. Unfortunately all Stefano’s family are based in Italy, and they don’t visit us, and both of my siblings live overseas, so my support network is only my mum, which does limit me as most of the care I need has to be paid for,

Toward the end of last year, the stress of caring for Stefano at home began to overwhelm me and he is now in full time care in a rest home. Since there things have been much more settled, and his level of care is now consistent, whether I am away working or at home. Stefano still comes home often to visit, and we see him most days, so I am still one of his primary caregivers.

Do you have a partner, and if so are they also freelance? What effect does this have?

Yes. He is terminally ill with Motor Neuron disease and needs 24/7 care. Stefano used to be a winemaker, a steady job with little travel, which made my performing/travelling life easy. It was going to be the perfect setup, till the S*%t hit the fan.

Do you have regular childcare, and if so, in what form? 

Yes. Monday-Friday, 8am-2pm and my mum cares for my son for my short gigs. For operas and local concerts I hire babysitters. This is incredibly costly, and particularly in the case of operas, can eat away at your profit so severely, you end up working for free. Many of my opera singing friends share this same story! There is no assistance for childcare outside of 9-5 in New Zealand.

Have you performed anywhere that made the work/parenthood balance easier?

Yes, Festival opera in Napier, NZ- they were amazing with letting me bring my 9 month baby to rehearsals and I was feeding him at the time. It worked well. My mum came and sat with Matteo just off the set and I came to visit when I had a moment free. At the moment I’m singing with NZ Opera and they’ve helped with car seats and airport pickups with a seats for Matteo- they’ve worked hard to make sure I had the right accommodation as well.

What can promoters/venues/festival organisers do to help freelance artists who are parents?

Be open about mothers having their breastfeeding babies at rehearsals. Allow babies in the rehearsal room. 

Help facilitate childcare if there are more than a few children who need to be cared for- if there was a parents/play room set aside at the rehearsal venue so mums can have more contact with their kids that would help. With a change station.  

They can give advance warning for all calls and promotional commitments so that babysitters can be arranged well in advance.

Be realistic about what new mums can and can’t achieve, and keep hiring us!!! We often sing better after having a child (I know I am!). 

Are there any organisations/venues/festivals etc that you have worked with that are particularly supportive of performers who are parents?

DSO in Dunedin have always been amazing, they let Matteo and also my husband watch rehearsals because they’re unable to come to the show. Auckland Philharmonic and Orchestra Wellington are both wonderful, in fact NZ orchestras in general have done everything they can to help. 

Festival Opera were really good. 

How did being a freelance musician affect your parental leave?

My parental leave unfortunately didn’t happen because my husband suddenly became ill two weeks before the birth, and was only able to continue working for about a month afterwards- he suddenly lost all strength in his hands. We were forced to go on a benefit for a year or so until I got back on my feet and started back into work properly.

Were you freelance before you had children? If not, what prompted the change?

Yes. Full time. And I taught some private voice students. It was a conscious decision to slow down the long-haul travel, for environmental reasons, but also because I wanted a better, more balanced home life. 

Are you part of any online social groups for freelancers/freelance parents? 

The Babies and Show Business Facebook group, which is mostly useful for UK things. There is a NZ Opera Chorus facebook group which has been my sole source of finding babysitting and support for my NZ engagements, 

If so, do they cater for your line of work?

Yes, particularly the NZ Opera group, which is full of lovely, helpful people, who have found themselves in similar situations and are happy to help.

Anna Leese is a soprano opera singer with an international career. She made her debut at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in 2007, as Musetta in Puccini’s La Bohème. Other roles include Ilia in Mozart’s Idomeneo with the Auckland Opera Studio, Female Chorus in Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia, Fiordiligi in Mozart’s Cosi Fan Tutte and Rosalinde in Strauss’s Die Fledermaus, all for the Benjamin Britten Opera School and Juliette in Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette with the British Youth Opera. She has performed the role of Tamiri in Mozart’s Il re Pastore at the Linbury Theatre, Royal Opera House (where she made her debut at age 24) and three Mozart heroines Fiordiligi, Countess Almaviva and Tamiri with the Classical Opera Company.

Visit Anna’s website, Facebook and Twitter.

How do you decide what to charge for music performance?

“As long as I come out of it with £100 after expenses, that’s OK”

I’ve heard this said so many times. And who by? Talented, trained professional musicians, with innovative, interesting programmes. Heading for the heights of their careers. Talking about giving a full-length professional concert as a soloist or part of a small group of musicians.

Pay in music performance is, like in many other professions, totally baffling for a lot of people. The more musicians I talk to, the more I think people are, on the whole, basically being paid what they ask for.

This is very troubling indeed. What we feel comfortable asking for is totally different, depending on our backgrounds. There is a lot written on this subject – just google “imposter syndrome” or “gender pay gap” (for example) and you’ll find a whole wealth of reading about how various minority groups have always accepted less for doing the same as those who are exactly as qualified and experienced, but don’t calculate their own worth in the same way as those who have been lucky enough to come from a background where they feel confident enough to ask for exactly what they want.

I’m deliberately using vague terminology here, as those who we generally associate with privilege and good self-confidence have been amongst those who I’ve heard saying they’ll gig for £100. Whilst there are definitely demographics that are more prone to this (and I may write more about this another time), lack of confidence in self-worth and imposter syndrome can be felt by anyone.

Often, people feel they need an agent to negotiate on their behalf. There’s no doubt that it’s easier to negotiate for someone other than yourself – I find negotiating for my clients much easier than negotiating for myself! – but this is not the only option.

It is possible to learn to do this for yourself, and it feels great, too!

In my new online course, Become Your Own Agent, I will help you work through any doubts, concerns or barriers that prevent you from charging the fees you want. (For those of you thinking this isn’t as simple as just asking for more, you’re right – I provide information on reasonable price points for different career stages, different occasions, and more.)

By the way, for anyone thinking £100 sounds OK for one concert, just have a think about the time spent rehearsing for said concert – does it still sound OK? Then think about the cost of all those music lessons. £100 might cover two lessons, maybe. Hmm.

Good news – I’m offering MORE than £100 off my Become Your Own Agent if you book in October! I’d love to see you there.

Julia Kogan: Soprano

International opera singer Julia Kogan shares her experience of balancing motherhood and an operatic career in the 90s.

Julia Kogan Soprano

How many children do you have and how old are they?

I have two sons, both are adults.

Tell us about your work and how it was structured when your boys were younger.

When my boys were young, I did quite a bit of teaching.  When they were 12 and 9 respectively, I began to travel much more, taking on long opera contracts, concert work abroad, etc.  I continued to teach, though, because I absolutely love it!  Paradoxically, teaching is a great way to learn more about singing. 

In terms of scheduling, as any freelancer knows, if you want to keep working, you can’t be turning too many things down.  As any parent knows, you need to be home as much as possible, especially if your kids are young.  If I’m perfectly honest, I’ve seen musician couples with utterly neglected children, at least by my standards.  Years later, I still feel anguished when I think of the times I was away from home singing for more than a few days at a time, not to mention a month at a time, which also happened.  My husband was home with them, but that doesn’t alleviate my guilt.

Tell us about your work/parenthood balance during that time. 

When my boys were little, it was very heavily skewed towards parenthood, though I worked on my singing constantly throughout.  Then this changed, and not a moment too soon in terms of my career!  I kept doing concert work locally, but in terms of the real thing, my career only took off when I was well into my 30s, after having had my sons in my early 20s.

Have you had to turn down opportunities because of being a parent? How did this make you feel?

I almost turned down my entire career, having taken so many years at home.  I remember flying to Germany once for an audition when Sam, my younger son, was three.  I made it a day trip to avoid missing a night at home, was exhausted as a result and had therefore sung badly – it was all a total waste of time and money.  I got home just as he was falling asleep.  He put his arms around me in his bed and said, “Promise me you’ll never do that again!”  I’d been gone twelve manic hours.  It was years before I went anywhere alone again.  It’s a brutal choice…and a highly personal one.

Do you have a partner, and if so are they also freelance? What effect does this have?

I was lucky to have had a husband who was a research professor and was able to work mostly from home when he wasn’t teaching.  It made a huge difference to us.

Did you have regular childcare, and if so, in what form? 

We really made it a goal for at least one of us to be home with our sons.  The price to pay was mostly in terms of my own professional life.

Have you performed anywhere that made the work/parenthood balance easier?

Sadly not!  And I must say that I don’t think that opera houses, or indeed anyone else, should be responsible for that.  It would be amazing if they were, but I’m afraid our families are indeed our problem.

What can promoters/venues/festival organisers do to help freelance artists who are parents?

I know of one festival where volunteers took on childcare duties for the festival director, but that’s exceptional!

Are there any organisations/venues/festivals etc that you have worked with that are particularly supportive of performers who are parents?

None.  But if I am ever in a position to do something about it, I will.  If I am ever a full producer on one of my projects, I will make sure there is childcare on the premises, if at all possible.

Julia Kogan is an international award-winning American-French opera singer, author and presenter.  She has performed at top venues around the world (Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Center, etc.), released five solo albums and has had her work featured by The New York Times, The Washington Post, Opera News, BBC Radio 3 and 4, and many others.

Julia’s BBC Radio 4 documentary, The Lost Songs of Hollywood, was chosen ‘pick of the week’ by the BBC.  She is the author of Hipstory, a book of Amit Shimoni’s art with text by Julia, as well as a series of children’s books, essays and screenplays.  For now, she remains the uncredited co-author of feature film Florence Foster Jenkins.

Read more about Julia on her website, or follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

Musicians: how does marketing yourself make you feel?

Do you know how to get the work you deserve? Are you confident finding performance opportunities, commissions, appropriate fees, good venues, recording contracts?

I’m Katie Beardsworth, director and founder of the Polyphony Arts agency representing a diverse client base of classical musicians, and I’m offering a bespoke online course – Become Your Own Agent – to help musicians like you acquire the skills and confidence to build a professional portfolio.

In four weeks, I will show you how the music industry works, teach you the best ways to promote yourself and your work, and provide advice on how to tackle the kind of challenges you will face such as fee discrepancies and imposter syndrome.

Whether you are just starting out or have years of experience as a professional musician, this is the course to help you achieve the career you aspire to and deserve.

The first course starts on 4 November, and there is a discount! Read more, and sign up:

Kieran Szifris: Octave Mandolin

“I find that it is possible to spend endless amounts of time working or parenting.”

In our 3rd blog post with freelance musicians who are also parents, we meet Kieran Szifris, folk musician and dad of one, with twins on the way.

How many children do you have and how old are they?

Technically 3! One’s 2 and the other two are 0…

Tell us a bit about your work and how it is structured.

I have regular weekly teaching work Monday-Wednesday with two local music schools and I have a few private students.  Around this commitment I can do rehearsals, often at those music schools or at the University. Then from Thursday to Sunday I am free to gig. My teaching commitments aren’t permanent so I can cancel or move them to suit any touring that comes up. I currently work with two well-known bands (Monster Ceilidh Band and Kathryn Tickell & the Darkening) and various other projects as and when. My schedule changes weekly.

Tell me about your work/parenthood balance. 

I find that it is possible to spend endless amounts of time working or parenting. Getting the right balance is often extremely hard as shirking your responsibilities on either front leads to anxiety.

Have you had to turn down opportunities because of being a parent? How did this make you feel?

Yes but really I have just become more picky about what I want to do. I feel I’ve sacrificed much more socially. Which, as a freelancer, can be problematic as I don’t meet as many  new musicians as I used to.

Do you have a partner, and if so are they also freelance? What effect does this have?

Yes, and yes. We both find it hard to find time to do as much office work as we’d like and will trade the childcare responsibilities with each other in order to get what needs to be done done.

Do you have regular childcare, and if so, in what form? 

We put our son into nursery every Tuesday morning. He sleeps in the afternoon so it generally gives us a day to do what we need to do separately.

Have you performed anywhere that made the work/parenthood balance easier?

No. There is little to no childcare provision at most venues

What can promoters/venues/festival organisers do to help freelance artists who are parents?

Make sure there’s always a clean, sanitary, dry, safe room with access to fresh water and hygienic waste disposal. They could also always provide the exact rider requested and if not consult the artist.

Are there any organisations/venues/festivals etc that you have worked with that are particularly supportive of performers who are parents?

Not particularly.

How did being a freelance musician affect your parental leave?

Lol – parental leave? My wife was gigging again 6 weeks after she gave birth. We don’t get holiday pay, sick pay/leave, maternity or paternity leave. 

Are you part of any online social groups for freelancers/freelance parents? 

No, but we have a loving and supportive family and lots of friends who are always eager to help.

Would you be interested in joining a social media community (such as a Facebook group) specifically for freelance musicians who are also parents?

Neither of us use Facebook though an easy to use guide for cities and towns with child friendly cafes/restaurants and things to do would be handy. 

Kieran Szifris is a musician who has spent most of his life in Newcastle upon Tyne. He began a career in music after graduating from Newcastle famous folk music degree and currently plays Octave Mandolin for Kathryn Tickell & the Darkening and Monster Ceilidh Band amongst other projects. Excitingly, the song “O-U-T spells out” which he co-wrote with Amy Thatcher and Kathryn Tickell has been nominated for a BBC Radio 2 folk award. He is known for his bombastic and lively playing style on his 8-stringed octave mandolin, which he often distorts the sound of through the use of guitar pedals.

https://kieranszifris.com/

New Facebook community for freelance musician parents

We are delighted to announce that we have created a Facebook group as a support network for freelance musicians who are also parents: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2369471933370782/?ref=share

Since I set up my business in an attempt to achieve good work/family balance, I’ve found a huge amount of online support for people doing what I do – mainly working from home, on their own schedules – but the reality for freelance musicians is completely different. The quest for good family/work balance is much more challenging when you are at the mercy of late-released schedules, engagements all over the world, and evening/weekend work where no regular childcare is available (to name but a few challenges!).

This group’s purpose is to provide a safe space for musician parents ask for help/advice, share successes, or have a moan, and to take steps to improve the world of work for freelance musicians.

If this speaks to you, please do join, and share with your friends!

The picture is of me and my rambunctious two year old, enjoying a pub lunch!

Nina Danon: Composer

Welcome to week 2 of our blog series on freelance musicians who are also parents. This week, meet Nina Danon, composer. She talks about managing the work/parent balance, and how it can feel like we have two sides to ourselves – something I think a lot of us can relate to!

Photo credit: Andreas Nold

When my partner and I decided to try for a child, I had only recently reached a point in my career where I was financially stable doing only music related work. I was balancing running my own private teaching studio with developing my career as a composer and sound artist. I was working full time, mostly long hours, and the idea of adding a baby to that was, frankly, terrifying. Throughout my life, various teachers, mentors and colleagues, both men and women, had warned me against starting a family if I was serious about becoming a composer, and I was afraid that becoming a mother would mean having to sacrifice my career. Luckily, I have always enjoyed proving people who make assumptions about me wrong, and I had always known I wanted to be a mother, so my husband and I decided to go for it!

A few months before I got pregnant, I got accepted as a composer into BOOK Music and Lyrics, a series of professional development workshops for musical theatre lyricists, composers and librettists. The course lasts two years, over which participants attend weekly meetings and are asked to present a new song every three weeks on average. I was over the moon about this opportunity, as I had always dreamt of working in musical theatre but had only very limited experience in that field. The first term put my resolutions of finding a good work/life balance to the test, as I went through a miscarriage, a wedding, and the first trimester of a new pregnancy. At the peak of my morning sickness (which was definitely NOT limited to the morning!), I had to write and present 4 songs in 5 weeks, working with 4 different lyricists, and moving house in the process. I suppose that’s when I realised that I was going to be ok…

The rest of the pregnancy went smoothly, and I continued working until a few days before Maël, my son, was born. The second year of BML started three weeks after the birth, and for my first six months of motherhood, keeping up with the workshop’s deadlines to develop my first musical was all I was able to do. My husband is a freelancer too, so he was able to take a lot of time off and was a tremendous help. We were also fortunate to have my family close by to look after the little one in situations where both of us had to work at the same time. I made a point of not missing any single deadline at BML, no matter how hard finding the time to write and rehearse with a newborn son was! It was extremely difficult, but also allowed me to feel like myself again while navigating through the life changing process of becoming a new parent.

I still find it tricky to reconcile the desire to be my child’s primary caregiver with the need to develop my career. I often feel like I am two different people, the stay at home mother who wishes to spend more time with her son, and the composer who wishes to create all the time. Switching from one to the next is hard, and I am still experimenting with different ways to balance the two. When Maël was seven months old I began applying for opportunities again and developing new projects, gradually increasing my workload. The unpredictability of my schedule makes it difficult to stick to rigid timetables, so I tend to avoid jobs that have strict working hours over several days or that would require too many meetings in locations where I wouldn’t be able to bring my son or at times where I wouldn’t be able to find a suitable childcare option. Becoming a mother has forced me to revaluate my priorities, be more strict with the type of projects I would accept, and as a result I have found the work I have done since having a child much more rewarding. I have been lucky enough to work with several collaborators and organisations which were very understanding of the needs of a new mother, and made me feel completely at ease, such as Psappha Ensemble, and my colleagues at BML, but this is not an industry that was built with parents in mind, and too often having a child is seen as a disadvantage, rather than the huge source of inspiration and strength it actually is!

If anyone reading this would like to encourage freelancers with young children to apply to their opportunities, please hold meetings/rehearsals/performances in child friendly venues!

This includes having a comfortable private area for breastfeeding and pumping and holding breaks long enough to allow a mother the time to do those things. Also, let parents know that their children (and a nanny or family member to look after the kids) are welcome, and offer a bit of flexibility to allow parents to fit their work around their children’s schedules (which are always very rigid). Too often, parents will feel uncomfortable talking about their obligations and special needs (imagine being a young woman and having to discuss your breastfeeding requirements with your middle-aged male employer) or fear appearing unprofessional if discussing any child-related issue. So, if you want to help, be the one to initiate the conversation. Offer all artists you work with a more flexible schedule, ask them what their requirements are. You will make them feel heard and comfortable, and they will be able to give you their best work.

Nina Danon is a Franco-Italian composer, pianist and audio-visual artist. She regards music as something that can be experienced through all senses, and collaborates with artists from all disciplines to establish new connections between their creative processes and redefine the relationship between music and other forms of art.

Her work encompasses sound and audiovisual art, film music, musical theatre and multi-sensorial experiences for galleries and museums. Over the years, she has collaborated with artists and ensembles including David Friedman and the Deutsches Filmorchester Babelsberg. Her music has been commissioned by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and the Zeni Winery and Wine Museum amongst others, and performed in venues such as the Museum of Oriental Art of Turin, the Criterion Theatre and The Place in London. In 2018, Nina was selected to take part in Psappha Ensemble’s Composing For scheme, writing a new piece for clarinetist Dov Goldberg.

Nina is a member of the Advanced Group of BOOK Music and Lyrics, a programme of ongoing workshops for the creation, crafting and development of musical theatre writing and related specialist skills.

Website: https://www.ninadanon.com/

Twitter: @ncdanon (https://twitter.com/ncdanon)

Bandcamp: https://ninadanon.bandcamp.com/